Friday, July 15, 2016

Lumbini - Entering Nepal

I woke up more groggy than ever as we were up again before the sun. We bundled ourselves into a tourist vehicle for the last time and mentally prepared ourselves for the 12 hour drive ahead. No amount of mental preparation could have prepared us for that drive. The driver seem to use the the brake and accelerator as if he was tapping along to songs on the radio. It didn't help that the road is notoriously full of potholes and I was sitting in the boot essentially. Thankfully, for my inner ear, we got a flat type which none of us were surprised about, in fact we were surprised it hadn't happened earlier. However, this did mean that we had to get out of the car in that stereotypical village where it seems like nobody had seen a tourist before. I couldn't look around without being greeted by the stares of men from a country that hasn't mastered the art of subtlety.

The driver seemed to take the flat tire incident as a means to take things easy but when offered to chance to walk over the border we were all quick to accept the challenge. The bumpy drive was a fitting send off as we said goodbye to the chaos of India and made out way into Nepal. There was little to differentiate Nepal and India at the time other than the stamps in our passports and the uniforms on officials. This changed as we drove on; the roads had lines painted on them, houses were grander and locals were less interested in you as tourists. The fact we were in a mini-bus with air-con and space to spread out on may have accentuated this bias view.


Lumbini is the birthplace of Buddha and therefore a pilgrimage sight to many Buddhists. Our stop here was to visit the shrine  and temple over the exact spot Buddha was born. We stayed overnight in a very lavish hotel called Buddha Mya Gardens and joined the crowds of pilgrims heading into Lumbini. Getting to this birthplace was no simple feat as we had to get a bus to a market place dedicated to selling tickets to local landmarks and then get another bus to the landmark, well a point that was a 10 minute walk from the site.

The temple itself stuck to Buddhist principles and was quite modest for a temple being a white building with a small door but at the same time it was guarded by armed police and body scanners. Outside the temple there were monks hiding from the heat under trees and the compulsory westerner who'd decided to leave home and dedicate their life to meditation. Inside there was what looked like an excavation site and a glass box over the marker stone showing exactly where Buddha was born. To this day I still have no idea if I was looking at the right stone or not...



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